Economy

Politics has made a rude re-entry into investing

Fund managers used to boast they paid no attention to politics. That, says Merryn Somerset Webb, is no longer the case.

What does May’s victory mean for markets?

After Theresa May’s less than convincing win in the Conservative Party’s no confidence vote, John Stepek looks at how the markets have reacted, and what it means for your money.

How much gold does China have? A lot more than you think

Officially, China has the world’s seventh-largest gold reserves. But it has been stocking up at an astonishing pace. Here, Dominic Frisby examines just how much gold China could have.

Votes for women and the rise of the welfare state

Since women got the vote a century ago, we have developed a more progressive tax system and a transferred more wealth to the less well-off. That’s no coincidence, says Merryn Somerset Webb.

What really scares markets about the latest Brexit mess

Theresa May’s postponement of the Brexit vote has increased the chances of no deal. That’s rattled the markets. But it wouldn’t be the worst outcome. John Stepek outlines the markets’ biggest fear.

What’s next for global markets? Keep a close eye on the oil price

The price of oil has tumbled in recent weeks, just as stocks have lost their footing. John Stepek looks at what a rebound in crude would mean for investors.

Why America is still king

The global economic dominance of the US was supposed to be fading by now. But it’s just not happening, says Matthew Lynn.

Music industry back on song

In the 2000s, the internet threatened to sink the record industry. But now streaming has given the music business a new lease of life. Simon Wilson reports.

The charts that matter: introducing the terrors of the yield curve

The inverted yield curve is the latest spectre to terrify financial markets. John Stepek explains what t is, and looks at the rest of the charts that matter most to the global economy.

Chart of the week: China’s steep ascent

From 1990 to 2018, China managed to grow its GDP 35 times, while American GDP merely tripled and Germany’s doubled. And this steep trajectory is expected to endure.

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