Editor's letter

About Us

Welcome, and thank you for visiting us.

I'm Merryn Somerset Webb, editor-in-chief of MoneyWeek. Every day, an awful lot is written and spoken about finance and investing. Much of it is incredibly boring, lots more is either meaningless or plain stupid, and most of it is a complete waste of your time.

Our aim is simple: to give you intelligent and enjoyable commentary on the most important financial stories, and tell you how to profit from them. So how do we do that?

Firstly, by talking to thoughtful people who know their stuff. That means City professionals, fund managers, stockbrokers, industry experts, and the commentators that we respect. We have a wide range of financial professionals who write regularly for us, come to our monthly 'Roundtable' discussions, and who contribute their expertise to the ongoing MoneyWeek debates.

Secondly, by reading a huge amount of financial news and commentary every week. That means all the mainstream sources – press, websites and magazines – and many more specialised ones, such as broker reports, newsletters, newswires, trade journals and so on.

And finally, by writing articles that we would want to read ourselves, which means intelligent, thought-provoking, practical (as in, advice you can make money from) and entertaining, written in normal English.

Our weekly magazine is colourful, accessible, opinionated, and, we hope, a very good read. Plus, we have a complementary daily email, 'Money Morning', which gives you a succinct, punchy view of what's really going on in the markets.

So that's what we provide – a roundup of the most important financial stories, and practical investment advice to help you make money – all delivered in a way that will keep you entertained. 

Good luck with your investments, and I hope you will join us.

Best wishes

Merryn Somerset Webb, editor-in-chief

The MoneyWeek team

Merryn Somerset Webb

Merryn was a senior scholar at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, where she gained a first class degree in history & economics. She then became a Daiwa scholar and spent a year studying Japanese at London University.

In 1992 Merryn moved to Japan to continue her Japanese studies and to produce business programmes for NHK, Japan's public TV station. In 1993 she became an institutional broker for SBC Warburg, where she stayed for five years.

Returning to the UK in 1998, Merryn became a financial writer for The Week. Two years later, in 2000, MoneyWeek was launched and Merryn took the job of editor; she recently became MoneyWeek's editor-in-chief.

Merryn is a non executive director of three investment trusts, the Montanaro European Smaller Companies Plc (she was appointed in March 2011), Baillie Gifford Shin Nippon (October 2011), and Murray Income. She has published a book on personal finance for women, Love is Not Enough: The Smart Woman's Guide to Making (and Keeping) Money (HarperPress, 2007).

You can follow Merryn on Twitter at @MerrynSW.

Read all articles by Merryn.

John Stepek

John is the executive editor of MoneyWeek and writes our daily investment email, Money Morning. John graduated from Strathclyde University with a degree in psychology in 1996 and has always been fascinated by the gap between the way the market works in theory and the way it works in practice, and by how our deep-rooted instincts work against our best interests as investors.

He started out in journalism by writing articles about the specific business challenges facing family firms. In 2003, he took a job on the finance desk of Teletext, where he spent two years covering the markets and breaking financial news. John joined MoneyWeek in 2005.

His work has been published in Families in Business, Shares magazine, Spear's Magazine, The Sunday Times, and The Spectator among others. He has also appeared as an expert commentator on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, BBC Radio Scotland, Newsnight, Daily Politics and Bloomberg. His first book, on contrarian investing, The Sceptical Investor, was released in March 2019.

You can follow John on Twitter at @john_stepek.

Read all articles by John.

Andrew Van Sickle

Andrew is MoneyWeek's managing editor. He grew up in Vienna and then went to the University of St Andrews, where he gained a first-class MA in Geography & International Relations. While working at Harrod's selling knitwear, he began to contribute to the foreign page of The Week and soon afterwards joined MoneyWeek at its inception in October 2000.

Read all articles by Andrew.

Matthew Partridge

Matthew Partridge graduated from the University of Durham in 2004; he then did an MSc, followed by a PhD at the London School of Economics. He has previously written for a wide range of publications, including the Guardian and the Economist, and also helped to run a newsletter on terrorism. He has spent time at Lehman Brothers, Citigroup and the consultancy Lombard Street Research. Matthew is the author of Superinvestors: Lessons from the Greatest Investors in History

You can follow Matthew on Twitter at @DrMatthewPartri.

Read all articles by Matthew.

Ben Judge

Ben studied modern languages at London's Queen Mary College, before working for The Scotsman in Edinburgh, where he became deputy editor of the paper's website, scotsman.com. Ben joined MoneyWeek as website editor in 2008, and writes on alternative finance and fintech.

You can follow Ben on Twitter at @notbenjudge.

Read all articles by Ben.

Chris Carter

Chris Carter is the wealth editor at MoneyWeek. He graduated from Aberystwyth University in 2005 before gaining an MA in English from the University of York, where he specialised in Renaissance literature. Chris joined MoneyWeek in 2011.

Read all articles by Chris.

Nicole Garcia Merida

Nicole studied for a BA in journalism at Cardiff University, and has an MA in magazine journalism from City University. She joined MoneyWeek in 2019.

Read all articles by Nicole.

Matthew Lynn

Matthew Lynn is a columnist for Bloomberg, writing a weekly commentary syndicated in papers such as Die Welt, the Sydney Morning Herald, the South China Morning Post and the Miami Herald. He is also an associate editor of Spectator Business, and a regular contributor to The Spectator. Before that, he worked for the business section of the Sunday Times for ten years. Matthew is also a thriller writer.

You can follow Matthew on Twitter at @mattlynnwriter.

Read all articles by Matthew.

Dominic Frisby

Dominic Frisby (“mercurially witty” – the Spectator) is the world’s only financial writer and comedian. He is MoneyWeek’s main commentator on gold, commodities, currencies and cryptocurrencies. He is the author of the books Bitcoin: the Future of Money? and Life After The State. He also co-wrote the documentary Four Horsemen, and presents the chat show, Stuff That Interests Me.

His show 2016 Let’s Talk About Tax was a huge hit at the Edinburgh Festival and Penguin Random House have since commissioned him to write a book on the subject – Daylight Robbery – the past, present and future of tax will be published later this year. His 2018 Edinburgh Festival show, Dominic Frisby's Financial Gameshow, won rave reviews. Dominic was educated at St Paul's School, Manchester University and the Webber-Douglas Academy Of Dramatic Art.

You can follow Dominic on Twitter at @dominicfrisby

Read all articles by Dominic.

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