Plane battery that burned was not overcharged, investigation reveals

An investigation into the battery that caught fire aboard an empty Japan Airlines Boeing 787 in Boston this month has found it was not overcharged.

An investigation into the battery that caught fire aboard an empty Japan Airlines Boeing 787 in Boston this month has found it was not overcharged.

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said the battery did not exceed its designed voltage of 32 volts.

The group is continuing to examine the battery system and will meet Tuesday with officials from Securaplane Technologies Inc., the manufacturer for the 787s lithium ion batteries, at the company's headquarters in Tucson, Arizona.

"The team has developed test plans for the various components removed from the aircraft, including the battery management unit (for the APU battery), the APU controller, the battery charger and the start power unit," NTSB said in a statement.

While the voltage limit was not exceeded in the Japan Airlines plane, it is still possible the battery failures in the aircraft may be due to a charging problem, NTSB said.

If there is too much current flowing too fast into a battery, it can cause it to short-circuit and overheat even if its voltage remains within its design limit, according to the board.

Last week the Federal Aviation Authority announced a comprehensive review of the 787's critical systems and the aircraft's design, manufacture an assembly.

The Japan Transport Safety Board and French Bureau d'Enqutes et d'Analyses pour la scurit de l'aviation civile have also appointed accredited representatives to the investigation.

The Japan Airlines plane caught fire January 7th while it was sitting on the tarmac at Boston's Logan Airport.

In another incident an All Nippon Airways made an emergency landing in Japan last week after battery problems and a burning smell was detected in the cockpit and cabin.

All 50 of 787 Boeing planes delivered to airlines have since been grounded. The manufacturer has halted deliveries of new planes until it addresses the electrical problem.

RD

Recommended

Share tips of the week – 24 September
Share tips

Share tips of the week – 24 September

MoneyWeek’s comprehensive guide to the best of this week’s share tips from the rest of the UK's financial pages.
24 Sep 2021
Three strong Asian stocks trading at bargain prices
Share tips

Three strong Asian stocks trading at bargain prices

Professional investor Nitin Bajaj of the Fidelity Asian Values investment trust picks three stocks that dominate their industries, earn good returns o…
20 Sep 2021
Why it pays to face up to your investment mistakes
Investment strategy

Why it pays to face up to your investment mistakes

Buying stocks can be a complicated business. But selling stocks can be tricky, too – even if you sell for the right reasons. Max King explains how to …
17 Sep 2021
Share tips of the week – 17 September
Share tips

Share tips of the week – 17 September

MoneyWeek’s comprehensive guide to the best of this week’s share tips from the rest of the UK's financial pages.
17 Sep 2021

Most Popular

Two shipping funds to buy for steady income
Investment trusts

Two shipping funds to buy for steady income

Returns from owning ships are volatile, but these two investment trusts are trying to make the sector less risky.
7 Sep 2021
Should investors be worried about stagflation?
US Economy

Should investors be worried about stagflation?

The latest US employment data has raised the ugly spectre of “stagflation” – weak growth and high inflation. John Stepek looks at what’s going on and …
6 Sep 2021
A nightmare 1970s scenario for investors is edging closer
Investment strategy

A nightmare 1970s scenario for investors is edging closer

Inflation need not be a worry unless it is driven by labour market shortages. Unfortunately, writes macroeconomist Philip Pilkington, that’s exactly w…
17 Sep 2021