AUTHOR

Ben Judge

Ben studied modern languages at London's Queen Mary College, before working for The Scotsman in Edinburgh, where he became deputy editor of the paper's website, scotsman.com. Ben joined MoneyWeek as website editor in 2008, and writes on alternative finance and fintech.

You can follow him on Twitter - @notbenjudge

22 October 1962: Start of the Cuban missile crisis
This day in history

22 October 1962: Start of the Cuban missile crisis

On this day in 1962, the Kennedy administration issued its famous ultimatum – either the USSR removes its nuclear weapons from Cuba, or else.
22 Oct 2020
21 October 1805: the Battle of Trafalgar
This day in history

21 October 1805: the Battle of Trafalgar

On this day in 1805, Britain’s mastery of the seas was assured after the Royal Navy crushed Napoleon’s fleet at the Battle of Trafalgar.
21 Oct 2020
20 October 1935: Mao’s Long March ends
This day in history

20 October 1935: Mao’s Long March ends

Almost exactly a year after setting off, Mao Zedong and his army of communists arrived at the foot of the Great Wall of China on this day in 1935.
20 Oct 2020
19 October 1960: US begins its trade embargo on Cuba
This day in history

19 October 1960: US begins its trade embargo on Cuba

In retaliation for Cuba seizing American property, President Eisenhower banned exports to the island on this day in 1960.
19 Oct 2020
15 October 1987: the ‘Great Storm’ hits southern England
This day in history

15 October 1987: the ‘Great Storm’ hits southern England

On this day in 1987, winds of up to 115mph ravaged southern England, as the worst storm for nearly 300 years hit, causing devastation.
15 Oct 2020
14 October 1878: the first football match played under floodlights
This day in history

14 October 1878: the first football match played under floodlights

The world's first football match under floodlights took place on this day in 1878 at Bramall Lane in Sheffield, as the “Blues” played the “Reds” in an…
14 Oct 2020
13 October 1884: Greenwich adopted as the prime meridian
This day in history

13 October 1884: Greenwich adopted as the prime meridian

On this day in 1884, Greenwich was chosen as the prime meridian of longitude, settling the matter of time once and for all.
13 Oct 2020
12 October 1948: the first Morris Minor is produced
This day in history

12 October 1948: the first Morris Minor is produced

The first of 1.3 million Morris Minors, Britain’s cheap post-war runabout, rolled off the production lines on this day in 1948.
12 Oct 2020
Share tips of the week
Share tips

Share tips of the week

MoneyWeek’s comprehensive guide to the best of this week’s share tips from the rest of the UK's financial pages.
9 Oct 2020
8 October 1965: The Post Office Tower opens
This day in history

8 October 1965: The Post Office Tower opens

By far the tallest building in London at the time, the Post Office Tower was officially opened by Harold Wilson on this day in 1965.
8 Oct 2020
7 October 1920: Oxford University allows women to graduate
This day in history

7 October 1920: Oxford University allows women to graduate

On this day in 1920, the University of Oxford allowed women studying there to receive full degrees.
7 Oct 2020
6 October 1927: Premiere of The Jazz Singer
This day in history

6 October 1927: Premiere of The Jazz Singer

On this day in 1927, cinema-goers descended on the premiere of The Jazz Singer to see “the world's greatest entertainer” Al Jolson in one of the first…
6 Oct 2020
5 October 1936: the Jarrow Crusade sets off for London
This day in history

5 October 1936: the Jarrow Crusade sets off for London

On this day in 1936, 200 men set off on the Jarrow Crusade to march the 300 miles from County Durham to London to demand the government take action on…
5 Oct 2020
1 October 1908: the first Model T Ford is built
This day in history

1 October 1908: the first Model T Ford is built

On this day in October 1908, Henry Ford’s “car for the great multitude” – the Model T – was unveiled to the public. Over the next 19 years, 15 million…
1 Oct 2020
30 September 1965: Thunderbirds Are Go!
This day in history

30 September 1965: Thunderbirds Are Go!

On this day in 1965, International Rescue launched its first operation, as the classic Thunderbirds TV show aired for the first time.
30 Sep 2020
29 September 1829: London’s bobbies pound the beat for the first time
This day in history

29 September 1829: London’s bobbies pound the beat for the first time

On this day in 1829, the first of London's 'Peelers' hit the streets as the Metropolitan Police Force began its patrols.
29 Sep 2020
28 September 1894: Marks & Spencer opens its first 'Penny Bazaar'
This day in history

28 September 1894: Marks & Spencer opens its first 'Penny Bazaar'

On this day in 1894, Michael Marks and Tom Spencer opened their first ‘Penny Bazaar’ market stall in Leeds.
28 Sep 2020
24 September 1979: Compuserve launches MicroNET
This day in history

24 September 1979: Compuserve launches MicroNET

One of the first steps to the internet we know and love was taken today on this day in 1979, when Compuserve launched its MicroNET service.
24 Sep 2020
23 September 1641: the Merchant Royal sinks with 1.5 million ounces of gold
This day in history

23 September 1641: the Merchant Royal sinks with 1.5 million ounces of gold

On this day in 1641, the Merchant Royal became the most valuable shipwreck in history when it sank off Cornwall with over £20bn-worth of gold.
23 Sep 2020
21 September 1915: Salisbury man buys Stonehenge for his wife
This day in history

21 September 1915: Salisbury man buys Stonehenge for his wife

105 years ago today, Cecil Chubb paid just £6,600 when he bought 30 acres of Wiltshire and the world’s most famous Neolithic monument “on a whim” as a…
21 Sep 2020
16 September 1992: Black Wednesday sees sterling crash out of the ERM
This day in history

16 September 1992: Black Wednesday sees sterling crash out of the ERM

On this day in 1992 – 'Black Wednesday' – the value of the pound crashed as currency speculators sold, dumping sterling out of the European Exchange-R…
16 Sep 2020
14 September 1752: Britain adopts the Gregorian calendar and “loses” 11 days
This day in history

14 September 1752: Britain adopts the Gregorian calendar and “loses” 11 days

This day in 1752 saw Britain and its colonies “lose” 11 days, as it switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar.
14 Sep 2020
10 September 2008: the Large Hadron Collider is switched on for the first time
This day in history

10 September 2008: the Large Hadron Collider is switched on for the first time

The search for the mysterious Higgs boson kicked off in earnest today in 2008 when the Large Hadron Collider deep below Switzerland was switched on.
10 Sep 2020
9 September 1513: James IV’s invading Scots army defeated at the Battle of Flodden
This day in history

9 September 1513: James IV’s invading Scots army defeated at the Battle of Flodden

On this day in 1513, James IV of Scotland led a force of 30,000 Scots in battle against the English in Northumberland, where he and many of his nobles…
9 Sep 2020
8 September 1888: First Football League matches played
This day in history

8 September 1888: First Football League matches played

After messing about with friendlies, 'Tests' and cup matches for the last couple of decades, football got serious today in 1888, with the start of the…
8 Sep 2020
7 September 1940: the Blitz begins
This day in history

7 September 1940: the Blitz begins

On this day in 1940, Germany’s Luftwaffe began the Blitz, an eight-month campaign of bombing Britain’s major cities, killing over 40,000 people.
7 Sep 2020
3 September 1967: Sweden switches to driving on right-hand side of the road
This day in history

3 September 1967: Sweden switches to driving on right-hand side of the road

This day in 1967 was known as ‘Högertrafikomläggningen’ in Sweden. It was the day the country switched from driving on the left side of the road to dr…
3 Sep 2020
1 September 1859: the ‘Carrington Event’, the biggest solar storm ever recorded
This day in history

1 September 1859: the ‘Carrington Event’, the biggest solar storm ever recorded

On this day in 1859, a huge mass of magnetic particles erupted from the sun and hit the earth, knocking out telegraphs and putting on a spectacular di…
1 Sep 2020
The charts that matter: China stimulus drives copper demand
Global Economy

The charts that matter: China stimulus drives copper demand

With China promising more infrastructure building, the price of copper continues to rise. Here’s how that’s affected the rest of the charts that matte…
29 Aug 2020
27 August 1859: The birth of America’s oil industry
This day in history

27 August 1859: The birth of America’s oil industry

On this day in 1859, Edwin Drake struck oil in Titusville, Pennsylvania, proving that his pioneering drilling techniques were economically feasible.
27 Aug 2020
26 August 1768: Captain Cook sets sail on his first voyage of discovery
This day in history

26 August 1768: Captain Cook sets sail on his first voyage of discovery

On this day in 1768, Captain James Cook set off from Plymouth on his way to Tahiti and the fabled land of Terra Australis Incognita.
26 Aug 2020
26 August 1970: the Isle of Wight holds the UK's biggest-ever music festival
This day in history

26 August 1970: the Isle of Wight holds the UK's biggest-ever music festival

On this day in 1970, 600,000 people flocked to the Isle of Wight to witness the biggest music festival ever to be held in the UK.
26 Aug 2020
Graphene: the “miracle material” that will change the world
Tech stocks

Graphene: the “miracle material” that will change the world

Graphene is a layer of carbon one atom wide yet stronger than steel. It could ultimately revolutionise a vast array of industries, says Ben Judge.
25 Aug 2020
24 August 1947: the first Edinburgh Festival takes place
This day in history

24 August 1947: the first Edinburgh Festival takes place

This day in 1947 saw the start of the first Edinburgh Festival – which has grown to become the largest arts festival in the world.
24 Aug 2020
The charts that matter: gold dips after Buffett buys in
Global Economy

The charts that matter: gold dips after Buffett buys in

Warren Buffett bought into gold's bull market just as the price slipped again. Here's how the charts that matter most to the global economy reacted.
22 Aug 2020
20 August 1960: Russia’s ‘space dogs’ recovered alive
This day in history

20 August 1960: Russia’s ‘space dogs’ recovered alive

On this day in 1960, Russian mongrels Belka and Strelka became the first dogs to be recovered alive after having been shot into space.
20 Aug 2020