Next’s results stand out against a tough retail backdrop

FTSE 100 retailer Next is dealing well with the tough conditions on the high street, with rising profits and a plan that's working. Rupert Hargreaves looks at the numbers.

The UK retail sector is struggling (to put it mildly). Consumer confidence is crumbling in the face of rising inflation, and cost pressures are also wreaking havoc for companies. Against this backdrop, FTSE 100 retailer Next (LSE: NXT) should be struggling. Indeed, every single retailer that has reported earnings this year has warned that costs will rise, and profits will take a hit as a result. 

However, compared to many of its peers, the company seems to be navigating the current economic environment relatively well. Management now expects profit before tax for the current financial year to hit £850m, up 3.3% compared to last year. Earnings per share are set to receive a boost from share repurchases and rise 5% for the year. 

The FTSE 100 retailer has developed a competitive moat 

Next’s business model has several advantages over other companies in the retail sector. As well as the firm’s legacy business of buying and selling its own brands, the group also operates the LABEL platform. This platform stocks the brands of other retailers, generating commissions for Next when items are sold. 

Next has also been developing what management has called the Total Platform initiative, which allows third-party brands to access the firm’s infrastructure, charging a fee for the service (the fee is not disclosed but the group is targeting a profit margin of 5%-7% on sales). This increases the return from existing infrastructure investments with minimal spend on Next’s part. 

Sales on the LABEL platform expanded 20% in the 13 weeks to April. In comparison, Next’s own online sales slumped -24%. While the company expected this decline in own brand sales as online sales were boosted by retail closures last year, the figures show the strengths of the multi-brand offering. 

Compared to the same period in 2019, LABEL sales have risen a total of 106% over three years, while Next’s own brand sales are up 23%. Total online sales over this period (including the contribution from Total Platform) rose 47% overall. 

Next looks appealing in a competitive market 

A few weeks ago I stated that Next’s decision to invest to become the go-to aggregator for customers would help it stand out in a crowded sector. It looks as if that thesis is now playing out. 

Next is navigating the uncertainty as other retailers struggle. Notably, Boohoo (LSE: BOO), a former market darling, seems to be really struggling as rising costs and competition bite. It is also having to invest heavily to build out the infrastructure to maintain the level of service customers demand. 

Retail is tough business, but in this volatile industry, Next stands out for having a plan to help it rise to the top. So far, the plan seems to be working. With the stock trading at a price/earnings (p/e) ratio of just 11.2, the shares appear inexpensive. 

SEE ALSO:

Why Next is the only retailer I’d want to own in my portfolio

Don’t touch Boohoo with a bargepole – here’s what I’d buy instead

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