IAG looking at ways to raise more cash

International Consolidated Airlines Group (IAG), which owns British Airways, is looking to raise cash – its options include a rights issue or a share placing.

International Consolidated Airlines Group (IAG), which owns British Airways, is considering going “cap in hand” to investors, says Oliver Gill in The Daily Telegraph. A €2.75bn (£2.5bn) rights issue is one way it could boost its cash reserves. 

Other options include a share placing with major institutional investors or issuing loans that can be converted into shares. IAG has already sold £750m of Avios loyalty points for future flights to American Express. Meanwhile, trade unions Unite and GMB are angry because BA, which announced 12,000 redundancies in April, has refused to rule out asking staff to re-apply for their jobs. A “jumbo-sized” rights issue and “painful” job cuts are drastic measures that have already been factored into IAG’s share price and led to BA being called a “national disgrace”, says Alistair Osborne in The Times. But critics could do with some “perspective”. It is important to remember that IAG is competing with the “likes of Lufthansa and Air France-KLM”, which have already received €9bn and €10.4bn in state bailouts respectively. Self-help is surely better than “having the taxpayer refinance IAG, even if jobs are lost.

The pandemic may the “deepest crisis” that IAG “has ever faced”, but other airlines have been grappling with similar pressures, say Tanya Powley and Bethan Staton in the Financial Times. EasyJet has sought to raise £450m with an equity placing representing almost 15% of its share capital. Virgin has secured a £1.2bn rescue package. The two airlines have cut a respective 4,500 and 3,550 jobs.

Recommended

The charts that matter: bond yields slip while bitcoin tops $60,000
Economy

The charts that matter: bond yields slip while bitcoin tops $60,000

Cryptocurrency bitcoin soared to over $60,000 this week, while government bond yields fell back. Here’s how that has affected the charts that matter m…
16 Oct 2021
Whistleblower allegations – where now for Facebook?
Tech stocks

Whistleblower allegations – where now for Facebook?

The social-media giant has come in for some fierce criticism following revelations from a former employee. Just how much damage has been done?
16 Oct 2021
Inflation, energy crisis, strikes – have we gone back to the 1970s?
Investment strategy

Inflation, energy crisis, strikes – have we gone back to the 1970s?

Merryn and John talk about rising prices, productivity and the state of the labour market, plus are bond investors really the adults in the room, and …
15 Oct 2021
Cryptocurrency roundup: US overtakes China as biggest bitcoin miner
Bitcoin & crypto

Cryptocurrency roundup: US overtakes China as biggest bitcoin miner

The US becomes the world’s biggest bitcoin miner, Russia’s Vladimir Putin gets onside and JP Morgan’s Jamie Dimon gets sceptical. Saloni Sardana round…
15 Oct 2021

Most Popular

Inflation is still one of the biggest threats to your personal finances
Investment strategy

Inflation is still one of the biggest threats to your personal finances

Central bankers and economists insist inflation will be gone by next year. We're not so sure, says Merryn Somerset Webb. So if you haven’t started to …
1 Oct 2021
How to invest in SMRs – the future of green energy
Energy

How to invest in SMRs – the future of green energy

The UK’s electricity supply needs to be more robust for days when the wind doesn’t blow. We need nuclear power, says Dominic Frisby. And the future of…
6 Oct 2021
How to invest as we move to a hydrogen economy
Energy

How to invest as we move to a hydrogen economy

The government has started to roll out its plans for switching us over from fossil fuels to hydrogen and renewable energy. Should investors buy in? St…
8 Oct 2021