Wine of the week: a simply incredible English vintage

This late disgorged wine, which has spent nine years on its lees before release, is downright spectacular.

2011 Squerryes, Brut

2011 Squerryes, Brut (Late Disgorged 2020), Exclusive Vintage Reserve, Sevenoaks, Kent, England 

£65, reduced to £52 for “members” (there is no joining fee), squerryes.co.uk

I am a fan of Squerryes wines, although I don’t taste them as often as I would like because they tend to keep a low profile. I have previously written up both the 2010 and 2013 vintages, five and four years ago respectively, in my column in the Daily Mail, and more recently I have tasted the 2014, 2015 and 2016 vintages. All are very nice wines, and they seem cut from the same, fine cloth, but there has been a gradual evolution in their sophistication as the years roll by and this is evidenced in their depth and length of flavour. I put this down to vine age, as the roots search deeper and gather more complexity to embolden the fruit at harvest time.  

When I opened my featured wine, however, my whole understanding of Squerryes changed. Where I had been previously experiencing taut, unyielding acidity coupled with the infinitesimal blossoming of fruit tones, this late disgorged wine, which has spent nine years on its lees before release, is downright spectacular. It is smooth, succulent, layered and luxurious – a completely different beast to the regular vintage releases. You must seek it out to experience this incredible flavour. Winemakers and estates will of course be familiar with the concept of extended lees ageing (and the cost of holding back wines for years before release). But when the results are this epic, the agonising wait for vines to come to maturity is well worth it.

Matthew Jukes is a winner of the International Wine & Spirit Competition’s Communicator of the Year (matthewjukes.com)

Recommended

The charts that matter: more pain for goldbugs
Economy

The charts that matter: more pain for goldbugs

Gold investors saw more disappointment this week as the yellow metal took a tumble. Here’s what’s happened to the charts that matter most to the globa…
18 Sep 2021
The new social-care levy: an unfair tax that protects the “assetocracy”
National Insurance

The new social-care levy: an unfair tax that protects the “assetocracy”

The government’s regressive social-care levy will make Britain’s tax system even more complex. Root-and-branch reform is long overdue.
18 Sep 2021
10 great ideas for your home and interiors
Sponsored

10 great ideas for your home and interiors

Everything you need to give your home a boost
17 Sep 2021
Kieran Heinemann: the history of shareholder capitalism
Investment strategy

Kieran Heinemann: the history of shareholder capitalism

Merryn talks to Kieran Heinemann, author of Playing the Market: Retail Investment and Speculation in Twentieth-Century Britain, about the history of t…
17 Sep 2021

Most Popular

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest
Small cap stocks

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest

We are living in strange times. But the basics of investing remain the same: buy fairly-priced stocks that can provide an income. And there are few be…
13 Sep 2021
Two shipping funds to buy for steady income
Investment trusts

Two shipping funds to buy for steady income

Returns from owning ships are volatile, but these two investment trusts are trying to make the sector less risky.
7 Sep 2021
Should investors be worried about stagflation?
US Economy

Should investors be worried about stagflation?

The latest US employment data has raised the ugly spectre of “stagflation” – weak growth and high inflation. John Stepek looks at what’s going on and …
6 Sep 2021