I wish I knew what a margin call was, but I’m too embarrassed to ask

If you borrow money to invest and it all goes wrong, you could face a “margin call” from your creditors. But what exactly does that mean?

When investors buy shares or other financial assets, they can borrow money with the aim of boosting their returns. However, if things don’t go their way, they may face a “margin call”, and be forced to sell their holdings for a large loss.

Before we explain what a margin call is, we need to look at why someone might borrow money to invest in the first place. The easiest way is to compare it with using a mortgage to buy a flat.

Say you buy a flat for £100,000. You put down a 10% deposit – £10,000 – and borrow the other £90,000 from the bank. A year later, house prices have gone up. You sell the flat for £110,000. The price of the flat has gone up by 10%. But you have made a 100% profit. How? Once you repay the £90,000 to the bank, you are left with £20,000. You only put in £10,000 of your own capital. So you’ve doubled your money.

Of course, it cuts both ways. If house prices had fallen by 10% – heaven forbid! – the flat would have been worth just £90,000. All of the sale proceeds would have gone to the bank, and you’d have lost your original £10,000 – a 100% loss.

So borrowed money amplifies movements in the underlying asset price. This is why it’s known as “leverage” or “gearing”.

When an investor borrows to bet on shares, they also put down a deposit. In this case, it’s known as “margin”. The “margin” is there to protect the banks who lend the money.

A “margin call” happens when the margin available to cover any losses falls below a certain level. At that point, the banks demand the investor puts up more “margin” in the form of cash or other collateral. If they fail to do so, the banks may have to sell their holdings to reduce their own risk.

Day traders and spread betters often get margin calls. But it also happens to institutional investors, such as hedge funds. The risk with such margin calls is that if one heavily leveraged seller is forced to sell their shares, this might trigger margin calls for other investors, resulting in a domino effect.

This is why central banks have been known to step in when “systemically important” institutions have suffered margin calls in the past.

To find out more, subscribe to MoneyWeek magazine.

Recommended

Inheritance tax planning: using Aim shares to cut your inheritance tax bill
Inheritance tax

Inheritance tax planning: using Aim shares to cut your inheritance tax bill

If you have invested in companies listed on London’s Aim market, you can use them to reduce your inheritance tax bill, says David Prosser. Here’s how.
2 Aug 2021
Improve your odds of investment success with these three stocks
Share tips

Improve your odds of investment success with these three stocks

Professional investor Tom Wildgoose of the Nomura Global High Conviction Fund highlights three of his favourite stocks.
2 Aug 2021
Premium Bonds: a better bet for savers when interest rates are low
Savings

Premium Bonds: a better bet for savers when interest rates are low

Cash is a dull investment with interest rates near zero – but there is one way to make it more exciting without risk
2 Aug 2021
George Iacobescu: the man who transformed London
People

George Iacobescu: the man who transformed London

George Iacobescu, the man who – quite literally – put Canary Wharf on the map, is stepping back from his executive role. He will be a tough act to fol…
1 Aug 2021

Most Popular

The MoneyWeek Podcast: Asia, financial repression and the nature of capitalism
Economy

The MoneyWeek Podcast: Asia, financial repression and the nature of capitalism

Russell Napier talks to Merryn about financial repression – or "stealing money from old people slowly" – plus how Asian capitalism is taking over in t…
16 Jul 2021
Why the UK's 2.5% inflation is a big deal
Inflation

Why the UK's 2.5% inflation is a big deal

After years of inflation being a financial-assets problem, it is now an “ordinary things” problem too, says Merryn Somerset Webb. But central banks st…
16 Jul 2021
Three companies that are reaping the rewards of investment
Share tips

Three companies that are reaping the rewards of investment

Professional investor Edward Wielechowski of the Odyssean Investment Trust highlights three stocks that have have invested well – and are able to deal…
19 Jul 2021