Money markets

‘Money markets’ is a generic term covering the vast market for short-term cash loans and deposits organised between institutions such as banks, companies and even the government plus the market for tradable securities that have a life of less than 12 months.

Cash is lent and borrowed at ‘money market rates’ which vary both by currency and also according to time. So, for example, the rate earned on a one-month US dollar deposit will naturally not be the same as that available on a three-month yen deposit.

Then there are ‘money market instruments’ which create liquidity. One example is Treasury bills, which are IOUs which enable the Treasury to borrow and lend funds over periods ranging up to a year.

MoneyWeek magazine

Latest issue:

Magazine cover
In the balance

How May 2015 could hit your pocket

The UK's best-selling financial magazine. Take a FREE trial today.
Claim 4 FREE Issues

Russell Napier: deflation is coming – hold on to your cash

Financial historian Russell Napier talks to Merryn Somerset Webb about the next deflationary bust – why it's coming, what it means for you, and how you can survive it.


Which investment platform?

When it comes to buying shares and funds, there are several investment platforms and brokers to choose from. They all offer various fee structures to suit individual investing habits.
Find out which one is best for you.


27 November 1924: Macy's first Thanksgiving Day parade

On this day in 1924, New York department store Macy's held its first Thanksgiving Day parade. It would soon become a city institution, kicking off the run-up to Christmas.