7 July 1928: sliced bread goes on sale for the first time

Taking “the greatest forward step in the baking industry since bread was wrapped”, the Chillicothe Baking Co of Chillicothe, Missouri, proudly put on sale its ‘Kleen Maid Sliced Bread’, on this day in 1928.

Marking the occasion, the Chillicothe Constitution Tribune declared that “The Chillicothe Baking Company has installed a power drive multi-bladed bread slicer which performs a feat which heretofore had been considered by bakers as being impossible – namely the slicing of fresh loaves”.

The bread slicer was invented by Otto Frederick Rohwedder, who had patented a “machine for slicing an entire loaf of bread at a single operation”.

But the slices produced by Rohwedder’s machine had to be held together with metal pins before being wrapped. It was not until Gustav Papendick of St Louis improved the machine that consumers could enjoy their bread free of iron spikes.

Before long, other bakeries were getting in on the act, and in 1930 the Continental Baking Company introduced ‘Wonder Bread’, and sold it across the US.

By 1933, 80% of the bread baked in American bakeries was sliced bread. Its success led to Americans eating more slices of bread than ever before. This led to a boom in toaster sales, and an increase in consumption of butter, jams, and spreads of all kinds.

Sliced bread first came to Britain in the 1930s. But we seem to be falling out of love with it. Consumption has been falling for decades, and on average, Britons now consume just two to three slices of bread a day, compared with seven slices a day 70 years ago.

66% off newsstand price

12 issues (and much more) for just £12

That’s right. We’ll give you 12 issues of MoneyWeek magazine, complete access to our exclusive web articles, our latest wealth building reports and videos as well as our subscriber-only email… for just £12.

That’s just £1 per week for Britain’s best-selling financial magazine.

Click here to take advantage of our offer

Britain is leaving the European Union. Donald Trump is reducing America’s role in global markets. Both will have profound consequences for you as an investor.

MoneyWeek analyses the critical issues facing British investors on a weekly basis. And, unlike other publications, we provide you with the solutions to help you turn a situation to your financial advantage.

Take up our offer today, and we’ll send you three of our most important investment reports:

All three of these reports are yours when you take up our 12 issues for £12 offer today.

MoneyWeek has been advising private British investors on what to do with their money since 2000. Our calls over that period have enabled our readers to both make and save a great deal of money – hence our position as the UK’s most-trusted investment publication.

Click here to subscribe for just £12