Wine of the week: a unique and very special pinot noir from New Zealand

The fruit in this Kiwi pinot noir is direct, pure and resonant, summing up the winemaker's intent in a single sip. 

2017 Seresin, Leah Pinot Noir, Marlborough, New Zealand

About £22.50, greatwesternwine.co.uk, nzhouseofwine.co.uk, noblegreenwines.co.uk, thedrinkshop.com

A few weeks ago, I enjoyed a fantastic morning tasting Michael Seresin’s new releases. If you recognise his name, but cannot quite place it, everything will fall into place when I take you away from the wine world and drop you on a film set. Michael is the renowned cinematographer responsible for such classics as Bugsy Malone, Midnight Express, Birdy, Angel Heart, Angela’s Ashes and more recently Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban and two Planet of the Apes pictures. 

A passionate Kiwi, planet-loving and pioneering, too, Michael founded Seresin in 1992 and he was one of the first high-profile people to embrace organic winegrowing. He has recently refocused his vinous exploits and he has trimmed his portfolio, too. The results are the most elegant and refined releases I have ever tasted from this brand. Leah is grassy and firm with near-cabernet franc freshness and, given that this is a bold pinot noir, you will sense that it is a unique and very special wine. The fruit is direct, pure and resonant and it sums up Michael’s intent in a single sip. 

Please also track down 2018 Sauvignon Blanc (£19.50, greatwesternwine.co.uk; £17.99, nzhouseofwine.co.uk) because it is terrific. With 8% semillon in the mix and 15% neutral oak tucked into its shimmering chassis, this is a crisp, tight wine which leans on its wondrous Raupo Creek ingredients.

Matthew Jukes is a winner of the International Wine & Spirit Competition’s Communicator of the Year (matthewjukes.com)

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