Cyberpunk 2077: Poland’s Punk project punished

Polish software group CD Projekt’s much-hyped game Cyberpunk 2077 was expected to sell around 30 million copies at $60 each. But Sony pulled it from stores after it was fund to be full of bugs.

Sony has “stunned” the gaming world by deciding to remove Polish software group CD Projekt’s game Cyberpunk 2077 from its online PlayStation store, say Leo Lewis and David Lee in the Financial Times. 

The game, “one of the most expensive and anticipated titles in industry history”,Polish software group CD Projekt’s much-hyped game Cyberpunk 2077 was expected to sell around 30 million copies at $60 each. But Sony pulled it from stores after it was fund to be full of bugs.; eight million people pre-ordered it. But when it was released on 10 December it was lambasted for being full of “crashes, visual glitches and malfunctioning mechanics”.

The hype surrounding the game caused CD Projekt’s shares to double in 2019 and gain “more than 50% this year”, despite “hiccups” resulting from three delays, says Kasper Viita and Piotr Bujnicki on Bloomberg. The surge saw the company exceed the value of the top European developer Ubisoft Entertainment SA. However, the stock has now slumped by 50% in a matter of weeks amid fears of a brutal backlash. Even if the firm can fix the bugs and persuade Sony to sell the game again, its image has been “seriously damaged” and it will take time to regain consumers’ trust.

The immediate future looks “dark”, say Mike Isaac and Kellen Browning in The New York Times. Already there has been “infighting and finger-pointing”, with staffers blaming executives for “unrealistic deadlines and false promises”. Many gamers are ditching Cyberpunk 2077 until it fixes all of the problems. Refund requests are “pouring in by the thousands” and lawyers are contemplating a class-action lawsuit, claiming that the group has engaged in potential “criminal misrepresentation in order to receive financial benefits”.

Recommended

The end of cheap money hits the markets
Stockmarkets

The end of cheap money hits the markets

Markets have swooned as central banks raise interest rates, leaving the era of cheap money behind.
28 Sep 2022
There is light at the end of the tunnel for investors
Sponsored

There is light at the end of the tunnel for investors

Investors are gloomy. But it’s not all bad, says Max King – the mood could be about to shift. You just need to hold your nerve for a little while long…
27 Sep 2022
The hidden cost of employee share schemes
Investment strategy

The hidden cost of employee share schemes

Paying employees in shares comes at a cost to investors – but it isn’t always easy to see how much, says Stephen Clapham.
26 Sep 2022
The MoneyWeek Podcast: you may not make any money this year – so just try not to lose any
Investment strategy

The MoneyWeek Podcast: you may not make any money this year – so just try not to lose any

In her final MoneyWeek Podcast, Merryn talks to James Ferguson, founder of the MacroStrategy Partnership, about why high inflation and rising interest…
22 Sep 2022

Most Popular

Earn 4.1% from the best savings accounts
Savings

Earn 4.1% from the best savings accounts

With inflation topping 10%, your savings won't keep pace with the rising cost of living. But you can at least slow the rate at which your money is los…
27 Sep 2022
How the end of cheap money could spark a house price crash
House prices

How the end of cheap money could spark a house price crash

Rock bottom interest rates drove property prices to unaffordable levels. But with rates set to climb and cheap money off the table, we could see house…
28 Sep 2022
What changes to the pensions charge cap mean for you
Pensions

What changes to the pensions charge cap mean for you

The government could raise the pensions charge cap – the amount you can be charged in your workplace's default pension fund. Saloni Sardana explains w…
27 Sep 2022