Great frauds in history: Philip Musica AKA "Dr Coster"

On the surface “Dr Coster” appeared to be a successful businessman, but in reality he was skimming money from his medical supplies company.

Philip Musica was born in New York City in 1884 and dropped out of school at the age of 14 to help out at his father’s grocery store. Within two years he was in charge, handing everyday operations to his younger brother while he set about undercutting competitors by dodging tariffs on imports. Thus began a three decade career as a swindler. He had two spells in jail for bribery and forgery in 1909 and 1913, getting his second sentenced commuted by volunteering to work as a government agent during World War I. In this period he changed his identity several times, eventually settling on Dr F. Donald Coster, and founding the Adelphi Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Company, as a front for bootlegging. By 1926 he had made enough money to buy McKesson & Robbins, a struggling consumer-medicine firm.

What was the scam?

On the surface “Dr Coster” appeared to be a successful businessman, overcoming the Great Depression to turn McKesson & Robbins into a company with sales of $174m by 1937 (around $3bn in today’s money). However, at least $19m ($332m today) of this was fictitious – one of Musica’s brothers forged sales documents between McKesson’s Canadian subsidiary and a shell company created to enable Musica to skim money from the parent company .

What happened next?

McKesson’s treasurer, Julian Thompson, noticed that the Canadian subsidiary had never returned any of its large paper profits to the main company and so tried to persuade the board to liquidate part of the Canadian firm’s inventory to raise some cash. He found that, instead of the subsidiary making money for McKesson, McKesson was paying money to support the Canadian branch. After reporting the matter to the board of directors, they fired Coster and brought in the authorities, who discovered his real identity, which prompted Musica to commit suicide.

Lessons for investors

Receivers appointed to look into McKesson’s books found that the company was still solvent, but the shares still plunged by more than 90% when trading in them, which had been suspended when the fraud was revealed, was resumed. The firm managed to survive and today McKesson Corporation is one of the largest medical-supply companies in the US, with a market capitalisation of more than $22bn. Sometimes, markets overreact to news of fraud.

Recommended

Iris Apfel: an inspiration to young fashionistas
People

Iris Apfel: an inspiration to young fashionistas

Iris Apfel made her name as a high-society interior designer before a show at the New York Met turned her into a fashion influencer. At 100 years old,…
19 Sep 2021
Warsaw and Stockholm: the unexpected new threats to the City of London
UK stockmarkets

Warsaw and Stockholm: the unexpected new threats to the City of London

London has seen off challenges from Frankfurt and Paris, but two other booming financial centres are a bigger threat, says Matthew Lynn.
19 Sep 2021
The charts that matter: more pain for goldbugs
Economy

The charts that matter: more pain for goldbugs

Gold investors saw more disappointment this week as the yellow metal took a tumble. Here’s what’s happened to the charts that matter most to the globa…
18 Sep 2021
The new social-care levy: an unfair tax that protects the “assetocracy”
National Insurance

The new social-care levy: an unfair tax that protects the “assetocracy”

The government’s regressive social-care levy will make Britain’s tax system even more complex. Root-and-branch reform is long overdue.
18 Sep 2021

Most Popular

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest
Small cap stocks

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest

We are living in strange times. But the basics of investing remain the same: buy fairly-priced stocks that can provide an income. And there are few be…
13 Sep 2021
Two shipping funds to buy for steady income
Investment trusts

Two shipping funds to buy for steady income

Returns from owning ships are volatile, but these two investment trusts are trying to make the sector less risky.
7 Sep 2021
Should investors be worried about stagflation?
US Economy

Should investors be worried about stagflation?

The latest US employment data has raised the ugly spectre of “stagflation” – weak growth and high inflation. John Stepek looks at what’s going on and …
6 Sep 2021