Ferrari Roma: taking us back to the Sixties

The Ferrari Roma shows off the Italian sports-car marque’s gentler and more elegant side.

Ferrari Roma

The “newest stallion in Maranello’s stables” is “the most beautiful Ferrari built in decades”, says Jared Zaugg on Maxim. The Roma represents “a return to the elegance of the 1960s grand tourers”, whose original purpose was to “embody elegance, luxury, power and performance in the most balanced way possible”. There is nothing “brutal” about the Roma’s design: it’s smooth, but evocative, indicating “reserved aggression ready to be unleashed if necessary” while remaining “incredibly harmonious to the overall sophistication”. 

On the road, the Roma’s 4.0-litre, twin-turbo V8 delivers 611 bhp and jolts you from rest to 62mph in just 3.4 seconds. But unlike with previous Ferraris, “you only get 560 torques. That’s still a lot, but it’s not so much that you immediately hit a tree,” says Jeremy Clarkson in The Sunday Times. When you put your foot down “there’s a combination of sound and torque-driven fury, it’s like you’ve dived head first into a vat of dopamine after drinking three pints of serotonin”. For years Ferrari has made cars that have been “way too big, way too powerful and really only suitable for the rich and famous in Saudi Arabia”. Driving one in Britain “is like trying to ride a cow through your local antiques shop”. Not the Roma. “It’s elegant and subtle and pretty and fast and surprisingly practical.”

The seats are “all-day comfortable” and the interior is “an easy and pleasant place in which to while away the miles”, says Ben Miller in Car. The ride is “surprisingly sweet for such a poised, responsive car” too. It’s easy to push the car to its limits, “safe in the knowledge” that the it “won’t be skittled off-line or caught out by mid-corner bumps”. And in race mode, “the Roma covers ground at a breathtaking rate… Gearshifts are complete before you know you’ve asked for them”. 

The Roma is not as fast or ferocious “as a “proper supercar”, says Sam Sheehan on Piston Heads. But it still delivers “many of the same sensations… it remains a mesmeric super-GT”. 

Recommended

The charts that matter: more pain for goldbugs
Economy

The charts that matter: more pain for goldbugs

Gold investors saw more disappointment this week as the yellow metal took a tumble. Here’s what’s happened to the charts that matter most to the globa…
18 Sep 2021
The new social-care levy: an unfair tax that protects the “assetocracy”
National Insurance

The new social-care levy: an unfair tax that protects the “assetocracy”

The government’s regressive social-care levy will make Britain’s tax system even more complex. Root-and-branch reform is long overdue.
18 Sep 2021
10 great ideas for your home and interiors
Sponsored

10 great ideas for your home and interiors

Everything you need to give your home a boost
17 Sep 2021
Kieran Heinemann: the history of shareholder capitalism
Investment strategy

Kieran Heinemann: the history of shareholder capitalism

Merryn talks to Kieran Heinemann, author of Playing the Market: Retail Investment and Speculation in Twentieth-Century Britain, about the history of t…
17 Sep 2021

Most Popular

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest
Small cap stocks

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest

We are living in strange times. But the basics of investing remain the same: buy fairly-priced stocks that can provide an income. And there are few be…
13 Sep 2021
Two shipping funds to buy for steady income
Investment trusts

Two shipping funds to buy for steady income

Returns from owning ships are volatile, but these two investment trusts are trying to make the sector less risky.
7 Sep 2021
Should investors be worried about stagflation?
US Economy

Should investors be worried about stagflation?

The latest US employment data has raised the ugly spectre of “stagflation” – weak growth and high inflation. John Stepek looks at what’s going on and …
6 Sep 2021