Jaguar F-Type: the E-Type lives on

The Jaguar F-Type, spiritual successor to the legendary E-Type, has had a revamp. It’s still as desirable as ever.

The hype surrounding the Jaguar F-Type when it was launched in 2013 was “palpable”, says Simon Davis in AutoCar. Here was one of Britain’s most revered sports-car marques launching its “first bona fide two-seat sports car in what felt like forever”. Its name explicitly marked it out as a “spiritual successor” to the legendary E-Type, and it took the fight to the likes of Porsche and its “formidable” 911. This new version doesn’t let us down either. It boasts “explosive straight-line performance and sports-car-like handling and stability” and, although it may not be as “technically capable” as some of its Porsche rivals, its “thuggish but charming sense of V8 character” makes it “the car I’d have”. 

Jaguar has breathed new life into this heavily revamped model, says Steve Sutcliffe in Auto Express, and not only does it “look sharper, but it drives much better… with sweeter steering, a crisper chassis and… thundering performance to match”. The styling has been sharpened all round, with a “more aggressive but prettier overall look than before” and the car looks “wider and meaner”, with new 20-inch wheels that fill the arches “to perfection”. The car’s tech has also “been much improved”, offering both Apple and Android connectivity and a new ten-inch central touch screen. But “arguably, it’s the bits you can’t see that Jaguar has improved the most”. 

Indeed, the F-Type’s V6 option has been “binned” and replaced with the 5.0-litre, supercharged V8 in the top-of-the-range model. That change has worked, says Matt Robinson on carthrottle.com. Power is kept to sensible-ish levels, meaning you can keep your foot down for longer before having to back off, and grip and traction levels are high, so the car “isn’t ever a handful to drive”. Compared with its competitors, the 2013 F-Type was begin to feel dated. The fact that you can compare the 2020 version “with a straight face” to the “current sports-car king”, the Porsche 911, shows how much better the latest F-Type has become, says Sutcliffe. “For personality, drama and sheer want-factor,” says Robinson, “you can’t help but be drawn to the F-Type.”

Price: £97,280 (for the top of the range coupé). Engine: 5,000cc, V8. Power: 567bhp. Torque: 516lb ft. Top speed: 186mph. 0-62mph: 3.7 secs.

Recommended

Why we should scrap the Budget
Budget

Why we should scrap the Budget

The yearly Budget, big set-piece of British politics, encourages the very worst from the government, says Matthew Lynn.
24 Oct 2021
The charts that matter: bond yields turn back up and a new bitcoin record
Global Economy

The charts that matter: bond yields turn back up and a new bitcoin record

Bitcoin hit a new all-time high, while government bond yields turned back up. Here’s how that has affected the charts that matter most to the global e…
23 Oct 2021
Larry Fink: the undisputed king of Wall Street
People

Larry Fink: the undisputed king of Wall Street

Larry Fink survived two big financial crises and went on to build a massive asset manager, doing for investing what Henry Ford did for cars. He has hi…
23 Oct 2021
Cryptocurrency roundup: bitcoin hits a new record high
Bitcoin & crypto

Cryptocurrency roundup: bitcoin hits a new record high

In the week when bitcoin hit a new high, we look at what’s been going on in the world of cryptocurrencies this week.
22 Oct 2021

Most Popular

Properties for sale for around £1m
Houses for sale

Properties for sale for around £1m

From a stone-built farmhouse in the Snowdonia National Park, to a Victorian terraced house close to London’s Regent’s Canal, eight of the best propert…
15 Oct 2021
How to invest as we move to a hydrogen economy
Energy

How to invest as we move to a hydrogen economy

The government has started to roll out its plans for switching us over from fossil fuels to hydrogen and renewable energy. Should investors buy in? St…
8 Oct 2021
How to invest in SMRs – the future of green energy
Energy

How to invest in SMRs – the future of green energy

The UK’s electricity supply needs to be more robust for days when the wind doesn’t blow. We need nuclear power, says Dominic Frisby. And the future of…
6 Oct 2021