Global economy

If this company manages to go public, it just has to mark the top of the market

Inverting yield curves and trade wars are all very worrying, says John Stepek. But nothing says “top of the market” like the stockmarket-listing of this company.

The charts that matter: the rush to safety

The now infamous yield curve inverted this week, and that’s sent investors running for cover. John Stepek looks at the charts that most most to investors to see how the markets have reacted.

How the shadow economy moves markets

Exchanges taking place under the official radar may seem harmless, but they can have big effects on the wider economy. Investors should pay attention, says Jonathan Compton.

Navigating the weird world of negative interest rates

Investors are paying good money to be allowed to lend money to governments across the world. What on earth is going on, and what does it mean for your money? John Stepek reports.

What is a yield curve, and why should I care if it inverts?

Everybody is talking about the inverted yield curve and how it predicts recessions. John Stepek explains everything you need to know about it and why it matters.

A beginner’s guide to Adam Smith, part II

Ahead of his talk on Adam Smith at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, Dominic Frisby looks at some of the great economist’s bright ideas.

Central banks turn on the money hose

After a decade of extraordinary monetary policies, central banks had started a long, slow march back to normality. They hadn’t got very far before turning back again.

The charts that matter: it’s all gone a bit pear-shaped

With the currency wars escalating, John Stepek looks at how the week’s events have shaped the charts that matter the most to the global economy.

Trump’s tariffs put pressure on the US Federal Reserve

Donald Trump’s bullying campaign against Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell yielded the first interest-rate cut in a decade.

Are trade wars rattling markets, or is it fear of another blow-up in Europe?

As the trade war intensifies, developed-world government bonds have sunk to new lows. But the root cause of the markets’ jitters could lie not so much in trade as in fears of another crisis in the eurozone.

Showing page 4 of 110