Emirates tries to squeeze in 30 more superjumbos

Airline giant Emirates is trying to find a way to make room for 30 new Airbus SAS A380 superjumbos.

Airline giant Emirates is trying to find a way to make room for 30 new Airbus SAS A380 superjumbos.

The world's biggest airline by international traffic is limited by lack of space at the carrier's Dubai base and curfews at destination airports, President Tim Clark told Bloomberg.

He said these issues had put a spanner in the works on lifting an existing order for 90 passenger planes to 120.

The largest A380 customer has exploited its position in the Gulf and the company is now considering sending superjumbos to locations including Houston, Los Angeles and San Francisco.

"We know what we want to do, we know where we could put more than 90 A380s today," the executive said.

"It's a question of can we actually fit them in? The economics of Houston are very powerful. That would be an extremely attractive proposition."

The carrier last year added 15 destinations including Rio de Janeiro, Buenos Aires, Barcelona and Seattle. Last month it introduced a fifth daily A380 flight to London.

This year Emirates has announced extra superjumbo flights to New York John F. Kennedy and Paris Charles de Gaulle airports.

It has also augmented its South East Asia service with more daily flights from Dubai to Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur.

However the introduction of new destinations and extra flights have done nothing to help solve limited airport opening hours and a crowded Dubai terminal.

"The airspace management around us, that's proving to be quite complex," Clark said. "We've got many carriers in the U.A.E. growing at quite a pace."

Clark said the company would be pitching recommendations to JetBlue Airways Corp. at Kennedy. Emirates is also building up its relationship with other carriers including Alaska Airlines in Seattle and AMR Corp's American Airlines.

Integrated schedules would make for easier transfers but airlines need to be "careful" about antitrust and pricing issues, he said.

RD

Recommended

Bunzl: boring is good for business
Share tips

Bunzl: boring is good for business

Food-service distribution company Bunzl is not a terribly exciting business, but it looks cheap and could be a great investment, says Rupert Hargreave…
30 Jun 2022
Five dividend stocks to beat inflation
Share tips

Five dividend stocks to beat inflation

During periods of high inflation, dividend stocks tend to do better than the wider market. Here, Rupert Hargreaves pick five dividend stocks for incom…
30 Jun 2022
Three Sharia-compliant growth companies
Share tips

Three Sharia-compliant growth companies

Professional investor Scott Klimo of the Saturna Al-Kawthar Global Focused Equity ETF tips three Sharia-compliant stocks.
30 Jun 2022
Why the cost of living crisis could be a boon for this cheap retailer
Retail stocks

Why the cost of living crisis could be a boon for this cheap retailer

Like many retailers, B&M is facing the dual headwinds of lower sales and higher costs as inflation bites. But its business model has proved hugely suc…
29 Jun 2022

Most Popular

Prepare your portfolio for recession
Investment strategy

Prepare your portfolio for recession

A recession is looking increasingly likely. Add in a bear market and soaring inflation, and things are going to get very complicated for investors, sa…
27 Jun 2022
Market crash: have we hit bottom or is there worse to come?
Stockmarkets

Market crash: have we hit bottom or is there worse to come?

For a little while, markets looked like they were about to embark on a full-on crash. And that could still happen, says Dominic Frisby. Today, he look…
27 Jun 2022
What the end of the 1970s bear market can teach today’s investors
Stockmarkets

What the end of the 1970s bear market can teach today’s investors

The 1970s saw the worst bear market Britain has ever seen, with stocks tumbling 70%. Things have changed a lot since then, says Max King. But there ar…
28 Jun 2022