Currencies

Push for profits

Invest with the activists to earn higher returns, says Matthew Partridge

Chart of the week: the loonie takes off

The Canadian dollar, nicknamed the loonie, has leapt to a two-year high around $1.21 against its US counterpart as a result of Canada’s robust eocnomy and higher interest rates.

Sterling’s slump should boost growth

One of the upsides of the Brexit vote was supposed to be that the slide in sterling would help rebalance the economy. It hasn’t worked out that way, yet, but it’s too soon to give up.

Sterling could soon bounce back

The pound has slid to its lowest level against the euro since 2009. But forex markets are notorious for overshooting and then snapping back quickly.

What’s unsettling the US dollar?

As the US dollar weakens, it pays to understand why it was so strong in the first place – and what’s changed, says Sean Corrigan of Cantillon Consulting.

We’ll all get burned by bitcoin

You may have steered clear of bitcoin, believing the digital currency to be in a bubble. But as Matthew Lynn explains, that doesn’t mean you won’t get burned.

What the South Sea Bubble can tell us about blockchain

The South Sea Bubble of 1720 arose out of an innovation in finance. Is blockchain heading down the same path, asks John Stepek.

The pound could hit parity with the euro – but if it does, buy it

Anyone visiting the continent this summer will have been in for a rude shock at the cash till, says Dominic Frisby. But the pound won’t stay down forever.

Bitcoin is a bubble – but bubbles change the world

There’s no doubt bitcoin is a bubble. But fear of missing out is trumping the fear of losing money. The top could be a long way off yet, says Dominic Frisby.

What’s next for the most important currency in the world?

The US dollar matters. And it has reached a turning point, says John Stepek. Where it goes next could shape the markets for months to come.

Howard Marks: no fan of cryptocurrencies

The mania in cryptocurrencies is one more proof of the prevalence today of financial naivety.

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