eBay sells off classified ads business

Norway’s Adevinta has bought eBay’s classified advertisements business to create the world’s biggest online classifieds group. 

Norway’s Adevinta has bought eBay’s classified advertisements business for $9.2bn (£7.1bn), says Michael Cogley in The Daily Telegraph – creating the world’s biggest online classifieds group. 

While Adevinta will pay $2.5bn of the purchase price in cash, the rest will come in the form of shares, making eBay Adevinta’s largest shareholder with a 44% stake. The hope is that by adding eBay Classified’s 12 brands in 13 countries to Adevinta’s 35 products in 15 countries, the Norwegian giant will be able to find savings of between $150m and $185m in “annual synergies”. The deal already seems to be paying off, say Richard Milne and Arash Massoudi in the Financial Times. Shares in Adevinta “rose by more than a third” shortly after it was announced, which for eBay lifted the paper value of the deal by “more than $2bn”. 

This vindicates eBay’s CEO, James Iannone (pictured), who convinced directors at the weekend that the American e-commerce group should “retain exposure” to the classified advertisements business instead of acceptinga slightly lower all-cash offer of $9bn from its Dutch rival Prosus.

Iannone seems to have negotiated a “good valuation” for a business that’s “slower-growing than peers”, says Liam Proud on Breakingviews. However, it’s harder to see what Adevinta gets from it. 

For instance, to achieve a 10% return on this investment, it will need to boost operating profit from last year’s $420m to $1.1bn – a big ask, “even if the pandemic boosts the number of people selling goods such as wardrobes online”.

Recommended

What you should do if your energy provider goes bust
Personal finance

What you should do if your energy provider goes bust

At least four energy firms have gone under in recent days as the price of gas and electricity soars. Saloni Sardana looks at what to do if your energy…
20 Sep 2021
China’s property woes are coming to a head – so what happens now?
China stockmarkets

China’s property woes are coming to a head – so what happens now?

Chinese property giant Evergrande is in big trouble. And with no bailout plan yet, markets are getting nervy. John Stepek looks at how things might go…
20 Sep 2021
Three strong Asian stocks trading at bargain prices
Share tips

Three strong Asian stocks trading at bargain prices

Professional investor Nitin Bajaj of the Fidelity Asian Values investment trust picks three stocks that dominate their industries, earn good returns o…
20 Sep 2021
Iris Apfel: an inspiration to young fashionistas
People

Iris Apfel: an inspiration to young fashionistas

Iris Apfel made her name as a high-society interior designer before a show at the New York Met turned her into a fashion influencer. At 100 years old,…
19 Sep 2021

Most Popular

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest
Small cap stocks

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest

We are living in strange times. But the basics of investing remain the same: buy fairly-priced stocks that can provide an income. And there are few be…
13 Sep 2021
Two shipping funds to buy for steady income
Investment trusts

Two shipping funds to buy for steady income

Returns from owning ships are volatile, but these two investment trusts are trying to make the sector less risky.
7 Sep 2021
How to stop recurring subscriptions becoming a drain on your money
Personal finance

How to stop recurring subscriptions becoming a drain on your money

Tracking and pruning subscriptions isn’t as easy as it sounds. Here's how to take charge.
14 Sep 2021