Minority interest

This is an accounting term for the amount of a balance sheet not owned by a firm’s shareholders.

This is an accounting term for the amount of a balance sheet not owned by a firm's shareholders. This arises because of the way two companies' balance sheets are combined when one buys the other, following UK rules. Say, for example, A plc buys 75% of B plc. A now controls B as it has a majority of the voting shares.

In a consolidated' balance sheet, you combine 100% of the assets A now controls so all of A plc and B plc. But in the bottom of the balance sheet, in the shareholders' funds section, you show what is owned by A plc. This means 25% of the net asset value of B plc is shown as a "minority interest" as it is technically owned by outside shareholders.

For example, if A and B have assets of £100m each, the combined balance sheet will show £200m of net assets. However, the shareholders' funds section will show the same £200m total but with a line minority interests' showing the 25% of B £200m x 0.25, or £50m not owned by A.

Most Popular

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest
Small cap stocks

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest

We are living in strange times. But the basics of investing remain the same: buy fairly-priced stocks that can provide an income. And there are few be…
13 Sep 2021
Two shipping funds to buy for steady income
Investment trusts

Two shipping funds to buy for steady income

Returns from owning ships are volatile, but these two investment trusts are trying to make the sector less risky.
7 Sep 2021
How to stop recurring subscriptions becoming a drain on your money
Personal finance

How to stop recurring subscriptions becoming a drain on your money

Tracking and pruning subscriptions isn’t as easy as it sounds. Here's how to take charge.
14 Sep 2021