Britain shoots for the top spot

England dominates European football. It looks as if it will take home the trophy for economic success, too, says Matthew Lynn.

947_MW_P16_City-View

Football triumph points to a bigger trend

Dramatic last-minute comebacks, nail-biting penalty shoot-outs, spirit, determination and the occasional flash of sublime skill. It's a been a great month for English football. Both the Champions and Europa League finals will be played between English teams, the first time any single country has so dominated the continent's most popular sporting spectacle. Three of the four finalists are from London. European football is turning into an extension of English sporting rivalries.

Money isn't everything, but it helps

That is just an early signal of a bigger trend that will become increasingly apparent as the 2020s unfold: the UK is becoming the dominant economic power in Europe, too. Just take a look at the figures. The British population is rising steadily, while other countries are about to go into steep demographic decline. Eurostat predicts the UK population will hit 77 million by 2050, up from 67 million now. By the same year, Germany will have shrunk to 74 million from its current 80 million. France will be roughly the same. No other country will be even close to matching our growth.

How will that translate into total GDP? It is hard to say, but a few points are clear. The UK is growing faster than both Germany and France, and has been for some time now. Right now, Germany still has a slightly higher GDP per capita than the UK $44,000 against $39,000 but that may well close. France's GDP per capita is already slightly lower than the UK's. And with ageing populations, both will have far fewer working people. On current trends, the UK should become the largest economy in Europe sometime in the 2030s.

There are other signs of growing British dominance. London is by far the largest city in Europe, with nine million people. Berlin is the next closest with only three million. London is much the richest, too. Inner London has a GDP per capita of six times the EU average; Luxembourg is in second place on just 2.5 times the average. The largest national stock exchange in Europe is London's, with more than 3,000 listed companies with a combined value of £3.7trn. Of the top ten universities in the world, three are British (Oxford, Cambridge and Imperial). The rest are all in the US there are none in the rest of Europe. London has produced 17 tech unicorns, compared with seven for its closest rival, Berlin, while a third of all tech start-ups worth more than a billion dollars are UK-based.

It's not just football that's coming home

Recommended

Why we will be reliant on fossil fuels for a long time to come
Energy

Why we will be reliant on fossil fuels for a long time to come

The energy crisis has shown us just how reliant we still are on fossil fuels. And we will continue to rely on them for a long time yet, says Merryn So…
27 Sep 2021
How the UK can help solve the semiconductor shortage
UK Economy

How the UK can help solve the semiconductor shortage

The EU’s plan to build a semiconductor manufacturing industry will fail, but the UK should take advantage of that, says Matthew Lynn
26 Sep 2021
What's behind Britain’s looming energy crisis
Energy

What's behind Britain’s looming energy crisis

Global natural gas prices have soared as resurgent demand collides with supply disruptions. The UK is especially vulnerable and could be heading for a…
24 Sep 2021
The Information Age is about to get interesting
Economy

The Information Age is about to get interesting

The IT revolution has been around for a while now, says Merryn Somerset Webb. But we're just getting to the good bit.
24 Sep 2021

Most Popular

A nightmare 1970s scenario for investors is edging closer
Investment strategy

A nightmare 1970s scenario for investors is edging closer

Inflation need not be a worry unless it is driven by labour market shortages. Unfortunately, writes macroeconomist Philip Pilkington, that’s exactly w…
17 Sep 2021
What really causes inflation? Here’s what prices since 1970 tell us
Inflation

What really causes inflation? Here’s what prices since 1970 tell us

As UK inflation hits 3.2%, Dominic Frisby compares the cost of living 50 years ago with that of today, and explains how debt drives prices higher.
15 Sep 2021
The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest
Small cap stocks

The times may be changing, but don’t change how you invest

We are living in strange times. But the basics of investing remain the same: buy fairly-priced stocks that can provide an income. And there are few be…
13 Sep 2021