Cameron’s reshuffle: cowardice or sound tactics?

Cameron's demotion of Michael Gove was either the mark of a 'disloyal weakling' or a canny and successful political move.

The impact of David Cameron's controversial cabinet reshuffle continues, with the demotion of Michael Gove from education minister to chief whip creating the most heated debate. "With less than ten months to go to polling day", says James Forsyth in The Spectator, it just shows that "politics trumps policy".

But "there is more to politics than tactics", says an editorial in The Sunday Times. "Governments need to demonstrate their purpose." By moving "one of the genuine radicals in his government", Cameron risks "leaving the Conservative partywithout a vision". And surely "the public-relations-driven cynicism of Cameron's reshuffle is so blatant that it will disgust rather than inspire", says Peter Hitchens in the Daily Mail. In truth, Gove's reforms "were greatly overrated", but at least he "got himself disliked by the right people". Meanwhile, by choosing "cheap, superficial cosmetic change the prime minister has shown himself a disloyal weakling" in the face of the pollsters.

Those accusing Cameron of cowardice forget "that even their great heroine, Margaret Thatcher, moved controversial ministers off the front line" come election time, says Andrew Rawnsley in The Observer. And if the move was a political ploy, then the signs are it is working, says The Daily Telegraph's Matthew Holehouse. The Conservatives' ratings on education have climbed to the highest level for two and a half years, according to the first poll since Gove was removed.

Recommended

Are UK house prices finally heading for a crash?
House prices

Are UK house prices finally heading for a crash?

The latest house price figures show a fall of 0.1% in July. With interest rates rising, inflation hitting double figures and a recession on the cards,…
5 Aug 2022
Brace yourself for the return of rationing
Economy

Brace yourself for the return of rationing

Russia is turning off the cheap energy. That is already leading to belt-tightening, says Matthew Lynn. Who will suffer most, and which sectors will th…
5 Aug 2022
Why do we use the weights and measures we do?
Economy

Why do we use the weights and measures we do?

The UK uses a particularly quirky mix of imperial and metric measures, and the subject of which is best can provoke considerable ire. Here, Dominic Fr…
4 Aug 2022
Interest rates rise to 1.75% – the highest level since December 2008
Personal finance

Interest rates rise to 1.75% – the highest level since December 2008

The Bank of England has raised interest rates from 1.25% to 1.75%, and warns that the UK will fall into a recession this year.
4 Aug 2022

Most Popular

Are UK house prices finally heading for a crash?
House prices

Are UK house prices finally heading for a crash?

The latest house price figures show a fall of 0.1% in July. With interest rates rising, inflation hitting double figures and a recession on the cards,…
5 Aug 2022
Brace yourself for the return of rationing
Economy

Brace yourself for the return of rationing

Russia is turning off the cheap energy. That is already leading to belt-tightening, says Matthew Lynn. Who will suffer most, and which sectors will th…
5 Aug 2022
Fear of missing out – what should investors do now?
Investment strategy

Fear of missing out – what should investors do now?

Markets have rallied from their mid-June lows. But if you missed out, as most investors did, what should you do now? Max King explains.
8 Aug 2022