Who will succeed Bernanke?

With Larry Summers out of the running, the race is on to succeed Ben Bernanke at the head of the Federal Reserve.

Lawrence Summers, reportedly the White House's preferred candidate to become the new chairman of the Federal Reserve, ruled himself out this week. Whichever candidate President Barack Obama nominates this autumn has to be confirmed by the Senate, and Summers acknowledged that he was unlikely to muster the support of a majority of lawmakers in the upper house. His withdrawal makes the current vice-chairwoman, Janet Yellen, the new frontrunner for the job. Current chairman Ben Bernanke's terms ends on 31 January 2014. Global equity markets rose on the news.

What the commentators said

"Judging by market moves," choosing the world's most powerful banker is "of paramount importance", as Lex pointed out in the Financial Times. But investors are overreacting. For one thing, there is actually little evidence that Yellen is much more dove-ish than Summers might have been, as the markets appeared to assume. And in any case, the chair of the Fed is just one person. "It is not as if Ben Bernanke" started discussing tapering the money-printing programme "without talking to anyone else first".

The wider issue, of course, is why "central bankers continue to be seen as superheroes" at all, as Allister Heath put it in City AM. As MoneyWeek has often pointed out, if central bankers were remotely competent, there would never have been a credit bubble and bust in the first place.

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