Maserati Ghibli Hybrid: keeping up with the Joneses

Everyone’s going green, but can Maserati really manage it with the Ghibli Hybrid? Chris Carter reports

The Ghibli Hybrid 2021 is Maserati’s first-ever electrified vehicle and “I’m sitting here like a Spurs fan after a dreadful first half, hoping against expectation for a change in fortune”, says Andrew English in The Daily Telegraph. “Somehow you want this car, named after the dusty Libyan wind which blows down from the highlands to the Mediterranean, to actually live up to the promise of the marque. Yet few modern Maseratis have managed this. Is this Ghibli saloon the one to break a series of ducks?”. 

Well, it’s certainly fast enough. The electric motor only really “adds a shoulder to the wheel” to the two-litre, turbo-charged petrol engine, meaning the Ghibli’s sonorous V6 has given way to a horrible-sounding if clever and “surprisingly adept” engine that should keep the EU’s emissions bureaucrats happy, if not fans of Maserati’s racing heritage and “ultra-cool” name. But the performance is respectable – the near two-tonne saloon can go from rest to 62mph in just 5.7 seconds and on to a top speed of 158mph. And the car looks as great as ever, with “sleek and flowing lines” outside and an interior that showcases “the artisan craft of leather trim”. Still, it’s doubtful this will be enough to please buyers shelling out £63,700 and seeking the genuine Maserati experience. 

You can’t blame Maserati for wanting to “keep up with the Joneses” in the industry’s “frantic rush towards a greener future”, says Steve Sutcliffe in Auto Express. Italy’s answer to Tesla this is not, but there has at least been an attempt to hold on to Maserati’s “core values”, with “strong styling, an elegantly classy interior and keen if not quite ground-breaking performance”. This is a “good-looking mild-hybrid saloon with a large hit of brand desirability whose owner will definitely want to drive rather than be driven in”.  

On the whole, it is a “splendid electrified executive ride to spend time with”, says Tim Barnes-Clay on Drive.co.uk, with “fulfilling, hard-hitting performance” and decent fuel consumption, considering its size. But the main draw is that Maserati remains a low-volume producer. “If you drive a conventional vehicle, you’ll park up, and nobody will give you a lingering look. If you drive an electrified Ghibli, many people will do a double-take. What value you put on that reaction is entirely down to you.”

Recommended

How to find the best dividend stocks
Income investing

How to find the best dividend stocks

Stocks that pay dividends tend to outperform the market over the long run - as well as providing an income. Here, Rupert Hargreaves explains the best …
28 Jun 2022
Boom times for the collectable watch market
Alternative investments

Boom times for the collectable watch market

Vintage and collectable watches are setting records at auction. Chris Carter reports.
28 Jun 2022
What the end of the 1970s bear market can teach today’s investors
Stockmarkets

What the end of the 1970s bear market can teach today’s investors

The 1970s saw the worst bear market Britain has ever seen, with stocks tumbling 70%. Things have changed a lot since then, says Max King. But there ar…
28 Jun 2022
S4 Capital – a company that still has much to prove
Share tips

S4 Capital – a company that still has much to prove

Audit delays set shares tumbling at advertising agency S4 Capital. It needs to show it can turn growth into profits, says Bruce Packard.
28 Jun 2022

Most Popular

Market crash: have we hit bottom or is there worse to come?
Stockmarkets

Market crash: have we hit bottom or is there worse to come?

For a little while, markets looked like they were about to embark on a full-on crash. And that could still happen, says Dominic Frisby. Today, he look…
27 Jun 2022
Interest rates are rising, here are the best savings accounts on the market
Savings

Interest rates are rising, here are the best savings accounts on the market

With inflation at more than 9%, your savings are not going to keep pace with the rising cost of living. But you can at least slow the rate at which yo…
24 Jun 2022
Why a recession will do us good
UK Economy

Why a recession will do us good

A period of slimming down is always painful, but it leaves us healthier for the long run, says Matthew Lynn.
26 Jun 2022