Features

Time to get tough on Myanmar

Nothing has changed in Myanmar since it began to emerge from military rule in 2011. It’s time for the rest of the world to take a stronger line.

912_MW_P09_P&E_Bottom

Suu Kyi: lacking authority

During her 15 years under house arrest by the then ruling military junta, the "courage, endurance and dignity" of Aung San Suu Kyi "won her global respect", says The Times. But in her role as the president of Myanmar, she has now come under "withering criticism" from a UN report for her refusal to stop, or even condemn, "atrocities that have been the bloodiest in Asia since the mass killings by the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia". The report claims that "at least 10,000 Rohingya civilians have been murdered, and 725,000 driven out of their homes in Myanmar's Rakhine state across the border into Bangladesh".

It may be unfair to criticise Suu Kyi for the atrocities, says Bertil Lintner on Asia Times. Her government is "legally and administratively hemmed in by the autonomous military, which maintains full control of the powerful defence, home and border-affairs ministries". Consequently, she "lacks any command control over the troops who were allegedly involved in acts the UN now says constitute genocide".

Still, if nothing has really changed in Myanmar since it began to emerge from military rule in 2011, it's time for the rest of the world to take a stronger line, says the Financial Times. Early on, "there was a case for treading softly", thus allowing Suu Kyi's National League for Democracy "to build on the political transition that was under way". Yet any democratic gains that were made "are now being reversed" as shown by the jailing this week of two Reuters reporters who revealed details of one massacre so that case "no longer holds". "It is high time for international pressure to be put back on."

Recommended

The charts that matter: the dollar extends its fall
Global Economy

The charts that matter: the dollar extends its fall

The US dollar took quite the tumble this week. Here’s how the charts that matter most to the global economy reacted.
17 Apr 2021
Why you should expect another stockmarket crash
Stockmarkets

Why you should expect another stockmarket crash

Many fear inflation, but a deflationary debt collapse is a more likely scenario in the near term, says Tim Lee
16 Apr 2021
What does the Coinbase listing mean for bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies?
Bitcoin

What does the Coinbase listing mean for bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies?

As the bitcoin price hit new highs, the world's biggest cryptocurrency exchange, Coinbase, listed on the stockmarket. John Stepek looks at what that m…
15 Apr 2021
US inflation is rising – but it’s not enough to rattle markets yet
Inflation

US inflation is rising – but it’s not enough to rattle markets yet

The latest US inflation figures showed that consumer prices are rising more rapidly than expected. But markets shrugged. John Stepek asks why, and wha…
14 Apr 2021

Most Popular

The bitcoin bubble will burst: here’s how to play it
Bitcoin

The bitcoin bubble will burst: here’s how to play it

The cryptocurrency’s price has soared far beyond its fundamentals, says Matthew Partridge. Here, he looks at how to short bitcoin.
12 Apr 2021
What does the Coinbase listing mean for bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies?
Bitcoin

What does the Coinbase listing mean for bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies?

As the bitcoin price hit new highs, the world's biggest cryptocurrency exchange, Coinbase, listed on the stockmarket. John Stepek looks at what that m…
15 Apr 2021
Lab-grown meat: the new agricultural revolution
Soft commodities

Lab-grown meat: the new agricultural revolution

Vegan alternatives are taking off, but the future of food technology lies in lab-grown meat – cultivating steaks and burgers from animal cells, says A…
16 Apr 2021