Stockmarkets

Markets: interest rate cut boosts FTSE 100

The FTSE 100 saw a sharp rise yesterday after the Bank of England cut interest rates to 0.25% and extended its quantitative easing programme. The index closed up 1.6% at 6,740.

Heathrow take-off stalls

Plans for a third runway at Heathrow were finally approved earlier this year. But how will it all be paid for? Marina Gerner reports.

Europe: offering a “decent bet” for next year

Around $50bn worth of equity investment has flowed out of the eurozone since January. But sellers have been harsh and Europe may offer a decent bet for 2019.

Why Japan is now even better value

We have considered Japan to be a bargain for some time. But having suffered some of the steepest declines of all major equity markets in the past few weeks, it is now even more appealing.

China stages “small” recovery

The CSI 300 index has tumbled 21% this year and in October alone it fell by 8%. But it has since staged a small recovery.

British stocks are in the bargain basement

Recent stockmarket jitters have been global, but uncertainty over our future relationship with the EU continues to dog British stocks. But therein lies opportunity.

Steve Eisman: I'll short Britain if Corbyn gets in

Steve Eisman has a basket of about 50 stocks he would short if Britain ends up with a “Trotskyite” prime minister.

Modi’s magic will power India for years to come

India looks ready to fulfil its long-term potential, says Rupert Foster. And Cris Sholto Heaton examines short-term risks in the financial sector and highlights the best investment trusts.

Markets like gridlock – but they shouldn’t take it for granted

The markets got what they expected out of the US elections: political gridlock, which means no meddling by politicians. But it’s only a temporary reprieve, says John Stepek. Here’s why.

The US vote doesn’t matter – what matters is which story markets choose to believe

Despite all the hype, the result of the US mid-term elections is irrelevant to investors, says John Stepek. The markets will spin it whichever way they choose.

Why the strong US jobs data could be bad news for investors

US companies are employing more people than ever, and wages are rising. That’s good for American workers, but not so good for the stockmarkets. John Stepek explains why.

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