Latest articles from MoneyWeek

How my Starbucks dream was nearly stolen

In 1987, Howard Schultz had the opportunity to buy Starbucks for $3.8m – but he was almost grumped, until Bill Gates’ father stepped in.

What Flashman teaches us about technology bubbles

Matthew Partridge examines what investors can learn from Flashman, the first in a series of comic historical novels by George MacDonald Fraser.

Is the department store doomed? Don’t count on it

Department stores, including House of Fraser, Debenhams and others, are in trouble. But history shows this retail format has the capacity to reinvent itself and bounce back, says Max King.

The business of being Katie Price

The one-woman soap opera has run out of cash. Will there be further episodes?

NS&I fails to keep up

The state-backed bank is popular, but there are better rates on offer elsewhere for savers, says Ruth Jackson.

Nicaragua lurches into crisis

A damning UN human rights report has put Nicaraguan president, Daniel Ortega, on the back foot. Emily Hohler reports.

The new scramble for Africa

Britain’s prime minister took a trip to Africa – but its leaders headed to Beijing. Emily Hohler reports.

Costa: Coca-Cola’s caffeine buzz

Fizzy-drinks giant Coca-Cola is diversifying into coffee. But while this strategy makes sense, Costa may not provide it with much of a boost.

Nafta deal: throwing sand in the global trade engine

The revamped Nafta deal between the US and Mexico does little to support global trade. In fact, it may do the opposite.

Time to get tough on Myanmar

Nothing has changed in Myanmar since it began to emerge from military rule in 2011. It’s time for the rest of the world to take a stronger line.

Brexit: May braces for a new assault

Brexit battles are resuming after Parliament’s summer break. Matthew Partridge reports.

Ditch the demented Help to Buy policy now

If we ever want the UK to have a slightly less dysfunctional property market than the one it has now, the government needs to get rid of Help to Buy, says Merryn Somerset Webb.

The fast-growing sport investors have never heard of

Esports may sound like a niche hobby for computer geeks, but it’s actually a burgeoning global business that resembles the early stages of the Premier League. Stephen Connolly explains how you can profit from it.

How bad will things get for emerging markets? And will the pain spread?

The mess in emerging markets is spreading beyond Turkey and Argentina. John Stepek looks into how things have got so bad, and what’s likely to happen next.

If you missed out on bitcoin, you might want to read this

If you missed out on bitcoin, you missed out on the greatest moneymaking opportunity we will ever see, says Dominic Frisby. But there could still be potential in the sector.

Why you should never buy a leasehold property

Having bought a leasehold property, you may think you own it. But you don’t, says Merryn Somerset Webb. Your freeholder owns it, and you are entirely at their mercy.

Don’t panic! Stagnant house prices are great news for us all

UK house prices are growing at their slowest rate for five years. John Stepek explains what’s behind the slowdown, and why it’s good news for everyone.

Public shaming – an effective new way of collecting taxes

Corporations publicly outed as tax dodgers; individuals denied honours. Shaming people into paying their taxes is probably effective, says Merryn Somerset Webb. But the government could go further.

Albert Edwards: winter is coming to the markets

US markets are heading for a collapse that could put the long-term future of the global financial system in danger, says Societe Generale’s Albert Edwards.

Why the US dollar is key to the fate of global markets

As the world’s reserve currency, the US dollar underpins the global economy – its rise and fall determines how markets move. John Stepek looks at why it matters so much.

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