This week in MoneyWeek: Laughing all the way to Latin America

Latin America cover story illustration

If you’ve not chosen a destination for your summer holidays yet, one springs to mind: Latin America. The region has come a long way since MoneyWeek regular James McKeigue first went there ten years ago. Back then, James, the intrepid young freelance journalist, narrowly avoided getting robbed at the border and blown up outside a police station. These days, things are a lot calmer.

“The decline of violence is, of course, to be welcomed for many reasons”, says James. “But one should be of particular interest to investors: the potential that peace and a greater sense of economic stability creates for a tourism boom.” No one’s saying it’s going to happen over night. But as James points out, “as the generally peaceful reality becomes clear, it will attract growing numbers of international visitors”.

That has opened up a veritable fiesta of investment opportunities for brave investors from airlines to resorts. To find out what James is tipping to profit from the rise of this colourful region, check out the full article here. If you’re not already a subscriber, sign up to MoneyWeek and get your first 12 issues for just £12. Olé!

Election fever

It’s probably not escaped you that the results of the election are out this morning. But as MoneyWeek magazine went to press on Wednesday, the winners and losers had yet to be decided. No matter, says MoneyWeek’s executive editor, John Stepek. Without knowing exactly who would get to feed Larry the Cat at Number 10, we can make five pretty safe assumptions about the direction this country is going in. Hint: expect government to get bigger, and for taxes to rise. To get the full picture, and find out what it all means for Brexit, take a look at John’s double-page feature in this week’s issue of MoneyWeek magazine.

We’re all keen to know how the new government gets on. But at MoneyWeek magazine, we’ve long known that one of our readers’ favourite questions is which way the housing market is heading. On the face of it, the answer would appear to be down. After all, house prices fell in May for the third month in a row, says my colleague Sarah Moore. So is it time to sell up and move abroad? Well, not so fast, says Sarah. “It doesn’t mean we’re about to see the much-predicted house price crash yet.” So, what exactly does it mean? Sarah gives her thoughts in this week’s issue. If you haven’t already signed up, grab a subscription now.

Trump’s bad call

Elsewhere in this week’s issue, Matthew Lynn in this week’s City View explains why Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris Agreement is not just bad news for the planet, but bad news for America. And Simon Wilson investigates what the government’s proposed plans to regulate the internet mean for investors on this week’s Briefing page. Max King looks at some of the best funds to invest in for solid income, and David Prosser explains how not to miss out on the best annuities in light of the new rules for pension providers. Meanwhile on the Shares page, Ben Judge looks at the latest fiasco to hit British Airways. Did the airline’s swingeing cost-cutting measures make the crisis affecting hundreds of passengers all but inevitable? And what does it mean for BA’s shares in the long run?

On the back pages, I take a look at the booming market in collectible handbags, and what you need to know to start your own collection. After all, just last week, a Hermès handbag sold for £292,000 at auction. No fickle fashion accessories these. Choose your bags carefully and after a few years, you could find yourself tucking away some serious gains at the back of your wardrobe.

Stuart Watkins is in full summer mode this week, scouting out the best bikes for sale, whether you’re scaling the nearest mountain, or just cycling to work. For a few more adventurous routes, Stuart also covers three of the best biking holidays to go on.

So, if you haven’t already, treat yourself to a subscription to MoneyWeek magazine. And don’t forget – you get your first 12 issues for £12.