The Corvette Stingray: A born-again American icon

Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51

This is the seventh generation of America’s original sportscar, now reunited with the ‘Stingray’ name that graced some of its most famous predecessors, says Mike Duff in Evo magazine.

The Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51 will be officially offered in the UK for the first time later this year. But can it stand up to some formidable competition?

Don’t write this Corvette off as some kind of dinosaur, says Duff. The basic formula has not changed – not the least of which is the 6,162cc V8 engine under the bonnet – but it’s also “packed with some serious tech”, including an advanced electronic stability control system, and improved cabin quality. And it drives impressively well, with excellent throttle response, surprisingly compliant suspension, competent steering, and a vast level of grip.

This Stingray adds a welcome dose of maturity to the thrills we’ve come to expect from a Corvette. The only downside is that, although a bargain in the US, the price in Britain will be prohibitive: £61,495.

On curvy roads the Stingray “tracks like a hunting dog”, says Marc Lachapelle of MSN Autos, and is impressively agile and controllable. Under hard acceleration, the sound from the engine is “glorious”. And yet the car makes for a smooth quiet cruiser too.

This Stingray “marks a true leap forward for the iconic American sports car and is a remarkable achievement in its own right”.

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