Vendor finance

Vendor finance is a creative way for a firm to fight falling sales. If a customer cannot afford to pay up front, it borrows the funds from the manufacturer. Turnover goes up, of course, but there’s a second win.

Say a business has £10 of stock at the start of the year, buys £100 during the year and ends up with £20 unsold. The ‘cost of goods sold’ expense is £90 (10+100-20). However, if the closing stock is valued at £40, thanks to a recent vendor-financed order at a higher selling price, then the expense falls to £70 (10+100-40).

But there’s a big risk – anyone needing a loan from a supplier to fund purchases could well be in dire financial straits, so there’s a danger the loan will have to be written off.

MoneyWeek magazine

Latest issue:

Magazine cover
In the balance

How May 2015 could hit your pocket

The UK's best-selling financial magazine. Take a FREE trial today.
Claim 4 FREE Issues

Russell Napier: deflation is coming – hold on to your cash

Financial historian Russell Napier talks to Merryn Somerset Webb about the next deflationary bust – why it's coming, what it means for you, and how you can survive it.


Which investment platform?

When it comes to buying shares and funds, there are several investment platforms and brokers to choose from. They all offer various fee structures to suit individual investing habits.
Find out which one is best for you.


28 November 1660: the Royal Society is founded

After the restoration of the monarchy, members of the 'Invisible College' asked King Charles II to approve their scientific and literary society on this day in 1660.