Chart of the week: the Bloomberg profanity index

Bloomberg 'profanity index'Bloomberg has come up with an unusual economic indicator: public profanity among CEOs. The more stressful the economic environment, the more they swear, judging by recorded conference calls since 2004.

The use of the four most common swear words spiked in the aftermath of the recession and fell as the recovery gathered steam. The words are “the infamous F-bomb, the scatological S-word, the blasphemous GD, and the derogatory AH”.

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